Bird Box by Josh Malerman

18498558Bird Box
Josh Malerman
Goodreads

Something is out there, something terrifying that must not be seen. One glimpse of it, and a person is driven to deadly violence. No one knows what it is or where it came from.

Five years after it began, a handful of scattered survivors remains, including Malorie and her two young children. Living in an abandoned house near the river, she has dreamed of fleeing to a place where they might be safe. Now that the boy and girl are four, it’s time to go, but the journey ahead will be terrifying: twenty miles downriver in a rowboat–blindfolded–with nothing to rely on but her wits and the children’s trained ears. One wrong choice and they will die. Something is following them all the while, but is it man, animal, or monster?

Interweaving past and present, Bird Box is a snapshot of a world unraveled that will have you racing to the final page.

Review:

There was a lot I liked about this book.  It was short which meant the plot had to be tightly unfurled and didn’t have any chance to go off on tangents or introduce characters that had no bearing on the book.  Everything was concise, efficient and unspooled in a way that, while not as detailed as some books, rocketed the tension up to make it a page turner in spots.  There were several areas where I wanted more and more, wanted to see what happened and how it happened.  Malerman’s writing is very spare, using words as weapons to really drive a point home or using the sparse and stripped language to paint a picture of a world torn apart.

I thought the book was building to finally revealing the antagonists that had been so feared and so talked about the entire book but that didn’t happen.  So, that was a bit of a let down, a bit of tension yanked away.  While I get what the author was going for in keeping things ambiguous, the previous pages had made me want to know more.  But, the climax is open ended, leaving the reader to imagine what might happen in the future to Malorie and her kids.

It’s an interesting book.  It’s short enough that I’d recommend because it won’t take you long to finish but I did wish for more because I felt like the end fell flat.

Hex by Thomas Olde Heuvelt

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Hex
Thomas Olde Heuvelt
Goodreads

Whoever is born here, is doomed to stay ’til death. Whoever settles, never leaves.

Welcome to Black Spring, the seemingly picturesque Hudson Valley town haunted by the Black Rock Witch, a 17th century woman whose eyes and mouth are sewn shut. Muzzled, she walks the streets and enters your homes at will. She stands next to your bed for nights on end. Everybody knows that her eyes may never be opened.

The elders of Black Spring have virtually quarantined the town by using high-tech surveillance to prevent their curse from spreading. Frustrated with being kept in lockdown, the town’s teenagers decide to break their strict regulations and go viral with the haunting, but in so doing send the town spiraling into the dark, medieval practices of the past.

Review:

I really enjoy books that make the setting an additional character. Black Spring the place was just as freaky as the Black Rock Witch. That ratcheted the tension up even higher, making certain parts of the book suffocating and overwhelming in intensity.

There were some slower parts of the book, parts that could have been cut out to make the book a bit shorter and tighter but they were few and far between. The characters, while not very memorable, played their parts well but they were really the backdrop for the town and the witch herself.

The only other quibble was that the author had quite the obsession with mentioning nipples, both men and women. I don’t know why or what’s behind it but dude really likes to describe nipples.

The Deep by Nick Cutter

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The Deep
Nick Cutter

A strange plague called the ’Gets is decimating humanity on a global scale. It causes people to forget—small things at first, like where they left their keys…then the not-so-small things like how to drive, or the letters of the alphabet. Then their bodies forget how to function involuntarily…and there is no cure. But now, far below the surface of the Pacific Ocean, deep in the Marianas Trench, an heretofore unknown substance hailed as “ambrosia” has been discovered—a universal healer, from initial reports. It may just be the key to a universal cure. In order to study this phenomenon, a special research lab, the Trieste, has been built eight miles under the sea’s surface. But now the station is incommunicado, and it’s up to a brave few to descend through the lightless fathoms in hopes of unraveling the mysteries lurking at those crushing depths…and perhaps to encounter an evil blacker than anything one could possibly imagine.

Review:

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That was basically me during the entire reading of this book.  It’s incredibly creepy with some triggering scenes of body horror but it’s also fascinating and engrossing as all get out.  It made me so, so tense and when it ended, I was both relieved because my heart got a break but also sad because I did want to see more of the story.